Company engagement email templates 2023

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WDI core indicators

Core WDI metrics are a small set of WDI indicators which capture the fundamental data companies need to be able to understand and improve the conditions of their workforce. 

Core indicators are not the most rudimentary or basic information a company should report on their workforce. Instead, they are indicators that provide data that, when not collected, significantly hampers a company’s ability to meaningfully improve working conditions and/or data that is indicative of a company’s broader approach to managing its workforce. It is, essentially, the data that acts as a ‘key’ to unlock better corporate action on workforce issues. 

Guiding principles 

When determining which WDI indicators would be selected as core indicators, the following principles were used to guide decision making: 

  • Indicators should provide the most insightful workforce data – if companies could only report against a limited number of indicators, which indicators would provide the greatest level of insight into a company’s workforce practices? 
  • This also relates to other reporting frameworks – if all reporting standards were to include 10-20 workforce indicators, which would be the most important for all frameworks to address? 
  • Indicators should elicit data that companies from all sectors should be reporting – this is not necessarily based on the data companies currently have. 
  • Indicators should not be chosen solely based on how easy it would be for companies to provide this data – the key factor here is insight into companies, not simplicity of reporting for companies. 
  • Indicators should cover the full spectrum of companies’ operations (i.e., the value chain). 

The following 19 indicators are proposed core indicators.  

It should be noted that the two questions on sick leave (8.12 and 8.13) are proposed as temporary core indicators given the importance of these indicators in the COVID-19 pandemic. The inclusion of these indicators would be reassessed for the 2022 WDI cycle, considering the global context for the pandemic at that time.  

A full list of all of these indicators, including the guidance for each question which sets out in detail what information companies should provide, can be found in the guidance document.  

2.1 Does the company conduct ongoing human rights due diligence to identify, prevent, mitigate and account for human rights risks and adverse impacts? 

2.1a If yes, provide more information (see guidance for what to include). 

2.1b If no, state why not and any plans to conduct human rights due diligence in the future. 

3.3 Provide the number and/or percentage (%) of the company’s employees on each contract type as a proportion of the total direct operations workforce. 

3.4 Provide the gender balance (as a percentage (%)) for each contract type in Q3.3, as well as the overall gender breakdown of your direct operations workforce. 

3.5 Provide the total number and/or percentage (%) of the company’s non-employee direct operations workers as a proportion of the total direct operations workforce. 

3.6 Provide the gender balance (as a percentage ((%) of the figures presented at Q3.5) for each contract types. 

3.7 Scope of disclosure (relates to Q3.3-3.6) 

  • Domestic operations/HQ only 
  • All significant operating locations 
  • ≤25% of direct operations workforce 
  • 26%-50% of direction operations workforce 
  • 51%-75% of direct operations workforce 
  • ≥76% of direct operations workforce 
  • All direct operations workforce 

3.8 Has the proportion of workers on contingent contracts (i.e. fixed-term/temporary employees, contractors, agency workers and/or third party on site workers) increased or decreased substantively over the last reporting period? 

3.8a If yes, explain why and if the company expects this trend to continue in the future. 

3.8b If no, state if there is likely to be a change in the use of contingent workers in the future. 

4.4 Provide the percentage (%) of the company’s total direct operations workforce in leadership positions by gender. 

5.1 Provide the CEO to median worker pay ratio. 

5.2 Provide the company’s median gender pay gap for the company’s domestic operations 

5.5 Provide the percentage (%) of female and male employees in the bottom, lower middle, upper middle, and upper pay quartiles. 

5.6 What is the percentage (%) of male and female employees, as a total of the direct operations workforce, whose basic salary is equal to the legal minimum wage, or just above? 

6.1 Provide the total involuntary and voluntary employee turnover rates (as a percentage (%)) during the reporting period and for female and male employees in the company’s direct operations. 

6.3 Describe how the company’s turnover rate has changed significantly since the last reporting period and explain any increase or decrease for any particular category of workers. If turnover has remained stable, state this. 

 8.12 What measures does the company have in place to ensure that workers who are unwell take sick leave, and other necessary leave, and are protected economically if they need to do so? 

8.13 Which workers are covered? Select all that apply. 

  • Indefinite/permanent employees 
  • Fixed-term/temporary employees 
  • Non-guaranteed hours employees (e.g. casual workers, on-call employees, zero-hours contracts/on-call employees) 
  • Contractors (e.g. independent, self-employed) 
  • Agency workers (e.g. labour agency, recruitment agency workers) 
  • Franchisee workers 
  • Third party on site workers (e.g. subcontracted service workers, third-party contract workers) 

 9.2 Provide the percentage (%) of employees covered by collective bargaining agreements for all locations in the company’s direct operations. 

9.3 Scope of disclosure (relates to Q9.2) 

  • Domestic operations/HQ only 
  • All significant operating locations 
  • ≤25% of direct operations workforce 
  • 26%-50% of direct operations workforce 
  • 51%-75% of direct operations workforce 
  • ≥76% of direct operations workforce 
  • All direct operations workforce 

9.9 Provide one example of how workers have influenced decision-making on an issue of substance in the reporting period. 

11.4 Provide the number of first tier suppliers in each of the company’s top ten sourcing locations (determined by percentage of overall procurement/spend). 

12.5 How does the company assess whether its sourcing and/or purchasing practices allow a supplier to meet its workers’ rights commitments e.g. by requesting feedback on the business relationship from suppliers etc.? 

13.5 Describe any steps or initiatives the company is taking to improve the working conditions of supply chain workers and provide evidence demonstrating the effectiveness of these measures. State where the company has collaborated with others to support system-level improvements, as applicable.